gardening

Dandelion: How to Recognise, Health Benefits and Uses

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Is there anyone who doesn’t know what a dandelion looks like? The typical yellow “weed” is best known for its fluffy white wishing balls. In this article I’ll discuss dandelion, a flower I love using in the kitchen.

Dandelion is usually seen as a weed, something people don’t want popping up on their lawn. Little do they know how useful dandelion can be! Every Spring I’m jumping of joy when I see the first couple of dandelions show themselves.

How to recognise dandelion
Dandelion leaves vary from dark to bright green, are hairless and have widely toothed edges. The stem is hollow. It is good to know that the stem only carries one flower. The flower itself is yellow, with multiple rows of narrow, long petals.

Photo by Elijah Hiett on Unsplash

Medicinal use of sage
In traditional Chinese and Native American medicine, dandelion root has long been used to treat stomach and liver conditions. Despite its long-standing use in traditional medicine however, there is a lack of scientific evidence supporting the medicinal use of dandelion root (source: verywellhealth.com).

Dandelion in the kitchen
Dandelion season means dandelion honey! Click here for my dandelion honey recipe. The best thing about dandelions is that every part can be used. Dandelion flower heads can be used decoratively in food. Leaves and stems make a nice salad (they taste slightly bitter and give your salad a nice bite). The roots can be used for herbal tea. The dried flower petals can be used in tea as well, or decorative in baking.

Dandelions contain lots of nutrients, including Potassium, Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, and vitamins A, B and C.

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